Showing posts with label Adobe Photoshop 7. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Adobe Photoshop 7. Show all posts

Saturday, December 31, 2011

Moving and resizing user slices


    You can move and resize user slices in Photoshop and ImageReady, but not in the Photoshop Save for Web dialog box. You can also move and resize slices using numeric coordinates. (See Resizing and moving slices using numeric coordinates.)
To move or resize a user slice:
  1. Select a user slice. In ImageReady, you can select and move multiple slices.
  2. Do one of the following:
    • To move a slice, move the pointer inside the slice selection border, and drag the slice to a new position. Press Shift to restrict movement to a vertical, horizontal, or 45° diagonal line.
    • To resize a slice, grab a side or a corner handle of the slice, and drag to resize the slice. In ImageReady, if you select and resize adjacent slices, common edges shared by the slices are resized together.
To snap slices to a guide or another user slice:
  1. Select the options you want from the View > Snap To submenu, and choose View > Snap. (See Using the Snap command.) A check mark indicates that the option is turned on.
  2. Move the selected slices as desired. The slices snap to any guide or slice within 4 pixels.

Selecting slices


    You select a slice with the slice select tool in order to apply modifications to it. In the Photoshop Save for Web dialog box and in ImageReady, you can select multiple slices.
To select a slice:
    Do one of the following:
    • Select the slice select tool slice select tool , and click on a slice in the image. When working with overlapping slices, click the visible section of an underlying slice to select it.
    To toggle between the slice tool and the slice select tool, hold down Ctrl (Windows) or Command (Mac OS).
    • (ImageReady) Select a slice in the Rollovers palette. (See Using the Rollovers palette.)
To select multiple slices (ImageReady):
    With the slice select tool slice select tool , do one of the following:
    • Shift-click to add slices to the selection.
    • Click in an auto slice or outside the image area, and drag across the slices you want to select. (Clicking in a user slice and dragging moves the slice.)
    In ImageReady, you can save, load, and delete slice selections. Using slice selections lets you reselect specific slices quickly and accurately.
To save a slice selection (ImageReady):
  1. Select one or more slices.
  2. Choose Slices > Save Slice Selection.
  3. Enter a name in the Selection Name text box, and click OK.
To load a slice selection (ImageReady):
    Choose Slices > Load Slice Selection, and select the name of the slice selection you want to load from the submenu.
    Note: You must save a slice selection before you can load it.
To delete a slice selection (ImageReady):
    Choose Slices > Delete Slice Selection, and select the name of the slice selection you want to delete from the submenu. Deleting a slice selection does not delete the slices themselves.

Using the Slice palette (ImageReady)


To display the Slice palette:
    Choose Window > Slice, or click the palette button  on the right side of the options bar for the slice select tool.

Selecting and modifying slices


    You can move, duplicate, combine, divide, resize, delete, arrange, align, and distribute user slices. There are fewer options for modifying layer-based slices and auto slices; however, you can promote a layer-based slice or an auto slice to a user slice at any time.
    In Photoshop, you cannot combine, align, or distribute slices. Jump to ImageReady to access these slice-editing capabilities.

Viewing slices


    You can view slices in Photoshop, the Photoshop Save for Web dialog box, and ImageReady. The following characteristics can help you identify and differentiate between slices:
    Slice lines
    Define the boundary of the slice. Solid lines indicate that the slice is a user slice or layer-based slice; dotted lines indicate that the slice is an auto slice.
    Slice colors
    Differentiate user slices and layer-based slices from auto slices. By default, user slices and layer-based slices have blue symbols, while auto slices have gray symbols.
    In addition, ImageReady and the Photoshop Save for Web dialog box use color adjustments to dim unselected slices. These adjustments are for display purposes only and do not affect the final image's color. By default, the color adjustment for auto slices is twice the amount of that for user-slices.
    Slice numbers
    Slices are numbered from left to right and top to bottom, beginning in the upper left corner of the image. If you change the arrangement or total number of slices, slice numbers are updated to reflect the new order.
    Slice symbols
    Indicate whether a user slice has Image Image slice or No Image user slice has Image or No Image content content; if the slice is a layer-based slice slice is a layer-based slice ; if the slice is linked slice is linked ; or if the slice includes a rollover effect slice includes a rollover effect .
To show or hide slices:
    Do one of the following:
    • Choose View > Show > Slices. To hide and show slices along with other items, use the Extras command. For more information, see Working with Extras.
    • (ImageReady) Click the Toggle Slices Visibility button Toggle Slices Visibility button .
To show or hide auto slices:
    Do one of the following:
    • Select the slice select tool, and click Show Auto Slices or Hide Auto Slices in the options bar.
    • (ImageReady) Choose View > Show > Auto Slices.
To show or hide slice numbers (Photoshop):
  1. Do one of the following:
    • In Windows and Mac OS 9.x, choose Edit > Preferences > Guides, Grid, & Slices.
    • In Mac OS X, choose Photoshop > Preferences > Guides, Grid, & Slices.
  2. Under Slices, click Show Slice Numbers.
To show or hide slice numbers and slice symbols (ImageReady):
  1. Choose Edit > Preferences > Slices.
  2. Under Numbers and Symbols, select a size for display symbols:
    • None to display no numbers or symbols.
    • The small icon to display small numbers and symbols.
    • The large icon to display large numbers and symbols.
  3. For Opacity, enter a value, or choose a value from the pop-up slider to change the opacity of the numbers and symbols display.
To show slice lines only (ImageReady):
  1. Choose Edit > Preferences > Slices.
  2. Under Slice Lines, select Show Lines Only.
To change the color of slice lines:
  1. Do one of the following:
    • (Photoshop) In Windows and Mac OS 9.x, choose Edit > Preferences > Guides, Grid, & Slices; in Mac OS X, choose Photoshop > Preferences > Guides, Grid, & Slices.
    • (ImageReady) In Windows and Mac OS 9.x, choose Edit > Preferences > Slices; in Mac OS X, choose ImageReady > Preferences > Slices.
  2. Under Slice Lines, choose a color from the Line Color pop-up menu.
  3. Changing the color of slice lines automatically changes the color of selected slice lines to a contrasting color.
To change slice color adjustments (ImageReady):
  1. Do one of the following:
    • In Windows and Mac OS 9.x, choose Edit > Preferences > Slices.
    • In Mac OS X, choose ImageReady > Preferences > Slices.
  2. Enter a value, or choose a value from the Color Adjustments pop-up slider for User slices, Auto slices, or both. (The User slices option controls color adjustments for both user slices and layer-based slices.)
  3. The value determines by how much the brightness and contrast of unselected slices are dimmed.

Converting layer-based slices to user slices


    Because a layer-based slice is tied to the pixel content of a layer, the only way to move, combine, divide, resize, and align it is to edit the layer. You can convert a layer-based slice to a user slice to unlink it from the layer.
To convert a layer-based slice to a user slice:
  1. Select a layer-based slice. In ImageReady, you can select multiple slices. (See Selecting slices.)
  2. Do one of the following:
    • (Photoshop) Click Promote to User Slice in the options bar.
    • (ImageReady) Choose Slices > Promote to User-slice(s).

Converting auto slices to user slices


    You can move, duplicate, combine, divide, resize, delete, arrange, align, and distribute user slices. You can also apply different optimization settings to user slices. In contrast, all auto slices in an image are linked and share the same optimization settings. This is because auto slices are regenerated every time you create or edit a user slice or layer-based slice.
    Converting an auto slice to a user slice prevents it from being changed when regeneration occurs. Dividing, combining, linking, and setting options for auto slices automatically converts them to user slices.
To convert an auto slice to a user slice:
  1. Select an auto slice. In ImageReady, you can select multiple slices. (See Selecting slices.)
  2. Do one of the following:
    • (Photoshop) With the slice select tool selected, click Promote to User Slice in the options bar.
    • (ImageReady) Choose Slices > Promote to User-slice(s).

Creating layer-based slices


    When you create a slice from a layer, the slice area encompasses all the pixel data in the layer. If you move the layer or edit the layer's content, the slice area automatically adjusts to encompass the new pixels.
    Example of how a layer-based slice is updated when the source layer is modified
    Layer-based slices are especially useful when working with rollovers. If you apply an effect to the layer--such as a drop shadow or glow--to create a rollover state, the slice automatically adjusts to encompass the new pixels. However, do not use a layer-based slice when you plan to move the layer over a large area of the image during an animation, because the slice dimension may exceed a useful size.
To create a slice from a layer:
  1. Select a layer in the Layers palette.
  2. Choose Layer > New Layer Based Slice.

Creating user slices


    You can create user slices with the slice tool or from guides, and in ImageReady, from a selection.
To create a slice with the slice tool:
  1. Select the slice tool hand or slice . Any existing slices automatically display in the document window.
  2. Choose a style setting in the options bar:
    • Normal to determine slice proportions by dragging.
    • Fixed Aspect Ratio to set a height-to-width ratio. Enter whole numbers or decimals for the aspect ratio. For example, to create a slice twice as wide as it is high, enter 2 for the width and 1 for the height.
    • Fixed Size to specify the slice's height and width. Enter pixel values in whole numbers.
  3. Drag over the area where you want to create a slice. Shift-drag to constrain the slice to a square. Alt-drag (Windows) or Option-drag (Mac OS) to draw from the center. Use snap to align a new slice to a guide or another slice in the image. (See Moving and resizing user slices.)
To create slices from guides:
  1. Add guides to an image. (See Using guides and the grid.)
  2. Do one of the following:
    • (Photoshop) Select the slice tool, and click Slices From Guides in the options bar.
    • (ImageReady) Choose Slices > Create Slices from Guides.
    When you create slices from guides, any existing slices are deleted.
To create a slice from a selection (ImageReady):
  1. Select a portion of the image.
  2. Choose Select > Create Slice from Selection.
  3. ImageReady creates a user slice based on the selection marquee. If the selection is feathered, the slice covers the full selection (including the feathered edges). If the selection is nonrectangular, the slice covers a rectangular area large enough to enclose the full selection.

Types of slices


    Slices you create using the slice tool are called user slices; slices you create from a layer are called layer-based slices. When you create a new user slice or layer-based slice, additional auto slices are generated to account for the remaining areas of the image. In other words, auto slices fill the space in the image that is not defined by user slices or layer-based slices. Auto slices are regenerated every time you add or edit user slices or layer-based slices.
    User slices, layer-based slices, and auto slices look different--user slices and layer-based slices are defined by a solid line, while auto slices are defined by a dotted line. In addition, each type of slice displays a distinct icon. You can choose to show or hide auto slices, which makes your work with user- and layer-based slices easier to view.
    subslice is a type of auto slice that is generated when you create overlapping slices. Subslices indicate how the image will be divided when you save the optimized file. Although subslices are numbered and display a slice symbol, you cannot select or edit them separately from the underlying slice. Subslices are regenerated every time you arrange the stacking order of slices.

About slices

You use slices to divide a source image into functional areas. When you save the image as a Web page, each slice is saved as an independent file that contains its own settings, color palette, links, rollover effects, and animation effects. You can use slices to achieve faster download speeds. Slices are also advantageous when working with images that contain different types of data. For example, if one area of an image needs to be optimized in GIF format to support an animation, but the rest of the image is better optimized in JPEG format, you can isolate the animation using a slice.



    Web page divided into slices: A. Image slice B. Layer-based slice C. No Image slice D. Slice that contains a rollover
    You set how the Photoshop or ImageReady application generates HTML code for aligning slices--either using tables or cascading style sheets--in the Output Settings dialog box. You can also set how slice files are named. (See Setting output options.)

Creating and viewing slices

A slice is a rectangular area of an image that you can use to create links, rollovers, and animations in the resulting Web page. Dividing an image into slices lets you selectively optimize it for Web viewing.

About designing Web pages with Photoshop and ImageReady


    When designing Web pages using Adobe Photoshop and Adobe ImageReady, keep in mind the tools and features that are available in each application.
    • Photoshop provides tools for creating and manipulating static images for use on the Web. You can divide an image into slices, add links and HTML text, optimize the slices, and save the image as a Web page.
    • ImageReady provides many of the same image-editing tools as Photoshop. In addition, it includes tools and palettes for advanced Web processing and creating dynamic Web images like animations and rollovers.
    When you save an image for use as a Web page, you can choose to generate an HTML file. This file contains information that tells a Web browser what to display when it loads the page. It can contain pointers to images (in the form of GIF, PNG, JPEG, and WBMP files), HTML text, linking information, and JavaScript code for creating rollover effects.
    You can integrate your Web production process by opening Photoshop files directly in Adobe GoLive. Slices, URLs, and other Web features in Photoshop files are accessible in GoLive for management and editing. You can also open Photoshop files in GoLive as page templates. Page templates display as a shaded preview and provide a visual guide for building a Web page in GoLive. For more information on using GoLive, see the Adobe GoLive User Guide.
    Note: You can preview most Web effects directly in Photoshop or ImageReady. However, the appearance of an image on the Web depends on the operating system, color display system, and browser used to display the image. Be sure to preview images in different browsers, on different operating systems, and with different color bit depths. (See Previewing an image in a browser.)

Customizing advanced color management settings

When you select Advanced Mode at the top of the Color Settings dialog box, you have the option of further customizing settings used for color management.

Specifying color management policies


    Each predefined color management configuration sets up a color management policy for the RGB, CMYK, and Grayscale color modes and displays warning messages to let you override the default policy behavior on a case-by-case basis. If desired, you can change the default policy behavior to reflect a color management workflow that you use more often. For more information on policies, see About color management policies.
To customize color management policies:
  1. In the Color Settings dialog box, under Color Management Policies, choose one of the following to set the default color management policy for each color mode:
    • Off if you do not want to color-manage new, imported, or opened color data.
    • Preserve Embedded Profiles if you anticipate working with a mix of color-managed and non-color-managed documents, or with documents that use different profiles within the same color mode.
    • Convert to Working Space if you want to force all documents to use the current working space.
    For detailed descriptions of the default behaviors associated with each policy option, see the table following this procedure.
  2. For Profile Mismatches, select either, both, or neither of the following:
    • Ask When Opening to display a message whenever you open a document tagged with a profile other than the current working space. You will be given the option to override the policy's default behavior.
    • Ask When Pasting to display a message whenever color profile mismatches occur as colors are imported into a document (via pasting, drag-and-drop, placing, and so on). You will be given the option to override the policy's default behavior.
    The availability of options for Profile Mismatches depends on which policies have been specified.
  3. For Missing Profiles, select Ask When Opening to display a message whenever you open an untagged document. You will be given the option to override the policy's default behavior.
  4. The availability of options for Missing Profiles depends on which policies have been specified.
    It is strongly recommended that you keep the Ask When Opening and Ask When Pasting options selected.
    Policy option
    Default color management behavior
    Off
    • New documents and existing untagged documents remain untagged.
    • Existing documents tagged with a profile other than the current working space become untagged.
    • Existing documents tagged with the current working space profile remain tagged.
    • For color data imported into a document using the same color mode, color numbers are preserved.
    • For all other import cases, colors are converted to the document's color space.
    Preserve Embedded Profiles
    • New documents are tagged with the current working space profile.
    • Existing documents tagged with a profile other than the current working space remain tagged with the original embedded profile.
    • Existing untagged documents use the current working space for editing but remain untagged.
    • For color data imported within the same color mode between either a non-color-managed source or destination, or from a CMYK document into a CMYK document, color numbers are preserved.
    • For all other import cases, colors are converted to the document's color space.
    Convert to Working Space
    • New documents are tagged with the current working space profile.
    • Existing documents tagged with a profile other than the current working space are converted to and tagged with the working space profile.
    • Existing untagged documents use the current working space for editing but remain untagged.
    • For color data imported within the same color mode between either a non-color-managed source or destination, color numbers are preserved.
    • For all other import cases, colors are converted to the document's color space.

Specifying working spaces


    In a color-managed workflow, each color mode must have a working space profile associated with it. (See About working spaces.) Photoshop ships with a standard set of color profiles that have been recommended and tested by Adobe Systems for most color management workflows. By default, only these profiles appear in the working space menus.
    To display additional color profiles that you have customized or installed on your system, select Advanced Mode in the Color Settings dialog box. To appear in a working space menu, a color profile must be bidirectional, that is, contain specifications for translating both into and out of color spaces. You can also create a custom RGB, CMYK, Grayscale, or Spot working space profile to describe the color space of a particular output or display device. (See Creating custom RGB profilesCreating custom CMYK profiles, and Creating custom grayscale and spot-color profiles.)
    For information about a specified RGB or CMYK working space profile, see the Description area of the Color Settings dialog box. (See Setting up color management.) The following information can help you specify an appropriate Gray or Spot working space:
    • For images that will be printed, you can specify a Gray or Spot working space profile that is based on the characteristics of a particular dot gain. Dot gain occurs when a printer's halftone dots change as the ink spreads and is absorbed by paper. Photoshop calculates dot gain as the amount by which the expected dot increases or decreases. For example, a 50% halftone screen may produce an actual density of 60% on the printed page, exhibiting a dot gain of 10%. The Dot Gain 10% option represents the color space that reflects the grayscale characteristics of this particular dot gain.
    Proof (no dot gain), and printed image (with dot gain)
    • For images that will be used online or in video, you can also specify a Gray working space profile that is based on the characteristics of particular gamma. A monitor's gamma setting determines the brightness of midtones displayed by the monitor. Gray Gamma 1.8 matches the default grayscale display of Mac OS computers and is also the default grayscale space for Photoshop 4.0 and earlier. Gray Gamma 2.2 matches the default grayscale display of Windows computers.

Customizing color management settings


    Although the predefined settings should provide sufficient color management for many publishing workflows, you may sometimes want to customize individual options in a configuration. For example, you might want to change the CMYK working space to a profile that matches the proofing system used by your printer or your service bureau.
    It's important to save your custom configurations so that you can reuse and share them with other users and Adobe applications that use the same color management workflows. The color management settings that you customize in the Color Settings dialog box are contained in an associated preferences file called Color Settings.
    Note: The default location of the Color Settings file varies by operating system; use your operating system's Find command to locate this file.
To customize color management settings:
  1. Do one of the following:
    • In Windows and Mac OS 9.x, choose Edit > Color Settings.
    • In Mac OS X, choose Photoshop > Color Settings.
  2. To use a preset color management configuration as the starting point for your customization, choose that configuration from the Settings menu.
  3. Specify the desired color settings (working spaces and policies). As you make adjustments, the Settings menu option changes to Custom by default.
  4. Save your custom configuration so that it can be reused. (See Saving and loading color management settings.)

Working with policy warnings and messages

The predefined color management workflows are set to display warning or option messages when a default color management policy is about to be used. Although you can disable the repeated display of some warnings and messages by selecting the Don't Show Again option, it is highly recommended that you continue to display all policy messages, to ensure the appropriate color management of documents on a case-by-case basis. (See Resetting all warning dialogs.) You should only turn off message displays if you are very confident that you understand the default policy decision and are willing to accept it for all documents that you open. You cannot undo the results of a default policy decision once a document has been saved.

About color management policies


    When you specify a predefined color management setting, Photoshop sets up a color management workflow that will be used as the standard for all documents and color data that you open or import. For a newly created document, the color workflow operates relatively seamlessly: the document uses the working space profile associated with its color mode for creating and editing colors.
    However, it is common to encounter the following exceptions to your color-managed workflow:
    • You might open a document or import color data (for example, by copying and pasting or dragging and dropping) from a document that is not tagged with a profile. This is often the case when you open a document created in an application that either does not support color management or has color management turned off.
    • You might open a document or import color data from a document that is tagged with a profile different from the current working space. This may be the case when you open a document that has been created using different color management settings, or a document that has been scanned and tagged with a scanner profile.
    In either case, Photoshop must decide how to handle the color data in the document. A color management policy looks for the color profile associated with an opened document or imported color data, and compares the profile (or lack of profile) with the current working space to make default color management decisions. If the profile is missing or does not match the working space, Photoshop displays a message that indicates the default action for the policy. In many cases you will also be provided with the opportunity to choose another action. For detailed information on the color management decisions associated with different policies, see Specifying color management policies.

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