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Saturday, December 31, 2011

Moving and resizing user slices


    You can move and resize user slices in Photoshop and ImageReady, but not in the Photoshop Save for Web dialog box. You can also move and resize slices using numeric coordinates. (See Resizing and moving slices using numeric coordinates.)
To move or resize a user slice:
  1. Select a user slice. In ImageReady, you can select and move multiple slices.
  2. Do one of the following:
    • To move a slice, move the pointer inside the slice selection border, and drag the slice to a new position. Press Shift to restrict movement to a vertical, horizontal, or 45° diagonal line.
    • To resize a slice, grab a side or a corner handle of the slice, and drag to resize the slice. In ImageReady, if you select and resize adjacent slices, common edges shared by the slices are resized together.
To snap slices to a guide or another user slice:
  1. Select the options you want from the View > Snap To submenu, and choose View > Snap. (See Using the Snap command.) A check mark indicates that the option is turned on.
  2. Move the selected slices as desired. The slices snap to any guide or slice within 4 pixels.

Selecting slices


    You select a slice with the slice select tool in order to apply modifications to it. In the Photoshop Save for Web dialog box and in ImageReady, you can select multiple slices.
To select a slice:
    Do one of the following:
    • Select the slice select tool slice select tool , and click on a slice in the image. When working with overlapping slices, click the visible section of an underlying slice to select it.
    To toggle between the slice tool and the slice select tool, hold down Ctrl (Windows) or Command (Mac OS).
    • (ImageReady) Select a slice in the Rollovers palette. (See Using the Rollovers palette.)
To select multiple slices (ImageReady):
    With the slice select tool slice select tool , do one of the following:
    • Shift-click to add slices to the selection.
    • Click in an auto slice or outside the image area, and drag across the slices you want to select. (Clicking in a user slice and dragging moves the slice.)
    In ImageReady, you can save, load, and delete slice selections. Using slice selections lets you reselect specific slices quickly and accurately.
To save a slice selection (ImageReady):
  1. Select one or more slices.
  2. Choose Slices > Save Slice Selection.
  3. Enter a name in the Selection Name text box, and click OK.
To load a slice selection (ImageReady):
    Choose Slices > Load Slice Selection, and select the name of the slice selection you want to load from the submenu.
    Note: You must save a slice selection before you can load it.
To delete a slice selection (ImageReady):
    Choose Slices > Delete Slice Selection, and select the name of the slice selection you want to delete from the submenu. Deleting a slice selection does not delete the slices themselves.

Using the Slice palette (ImageReady)


To display the Slice palette:
    Choose Window > Slice, or click the palette button  on the right side of the options bar for the slice select tool.

Selecting and modifying slices


    You can move, duplicate, combine, divide, resize, delete, arrange, align, and distribute user slices. There are fewer options for modifying layer-based slices and auto slices; however, you can promote a layer-based slice or an auto slice to a user slice at any time.
    In Photoshop, you cannot combine, align, or distribute slices. Jump to ImageReady to access these slice-editing capabilities.

Viewing slices


    You can view slices in Photoshop, the Photoshop Save for Web dialog box, and ImageReady. The following characteristics can help you identify and differentiate between slices:
    Slice lines
    Define the boundary of the slice. Solid lines indicate that the slice is a user slice or layer-based slice; dotted lines indicate that the slice is an auto slice.
    Slice colors
    Differentiate user slices and layer-based slices from auto slices. By default, user slices and layer-based slices have blue symbols, while auto slices have gray symbols.
    In addition, ImageReady and the Photoshop Save for Web dialog box use color adjustments to dim unselected slices. These adjustments are for display purposes only and do not affect the final image's color. By default, the color adjustment for auto slices is twice the amount of that for user-slices.
    Slice numbers
    Slices are numbered from left to right and top to bottom, beginning in the upper left corner of the image. If you change the arrangement or total number of slices, slice numbers are updated to reflect the new order.
    Slice symbols
    Indicate whether a user slice has Image Image slice or No Image user slice has Image or No Image content content; if the slice is a layer-based slice slice is a layer-based slice ; if the slice is linked slice is linked ; or if the slice includes a rollover effect slice includes a rollover effect .
To show or hide slices:
    Do one of the following:
    • Choose View > Show > Slices. To hide and show slices along with other items, use the Extras command. For more information, see Working with Extras.
    • (ImageReady) Click the Toggle Slices Visibility button Toggle Slices Visibility button .
To show or hide auto slices:
    Do one of the following:
    • Select the slice select tool, and click Show Auto Slices or Hide Auto Slices in the options bar.
    • (ImageReady) Choose View > Show > Auto Slices.
To show or hide slice numbers (Photoshop):
  1. Do one of the following:
    • In Windows and Mac OS 9.x, choose Edit > Preferences > Guides, Grid, & Slices.
    • In Mac OS X, choose Photoshop > Preferences > Guides, Grid, & Slices.
  2. Under Slices, click Show Slice Numbers.
To show or hide slice numbers and slice symbols (ImageReady):
  1. Choose Edit > Preferences > Slices.
  2. Under Numbers and Symbols, select a size for display symbols:
    • None to display no numbers or symbols.
    • The small icon to display small numbers and symbols.
    • The large icon to display large numbers and symbols.
  3. For Opacity, enter a value, or choose a value from the pop-up slider to change the opacity of the numbers and symbols display.
To show slice lines only (ImageReady):
  1. Choose Edit > Preferences > Slices.
  2. Under Slice Lines, select Show Lines Only.
To change the color of slice lines:
  1. Do one of the following:
    • (Photoshop) In Windows and Mac OS 9.x, choose Edit > Preferences > Guides, Grid, & Slices; in Mac OS X, choose Photoshop > Preferences > Guides, Grid, & Slices.
    • (ImageReady) In Windows and Mac OS 9.x, choose Edit > Preferences > Slices; in Mac OS X, choose ImageReady > Preferences > Slices.
  2. Under Slice Lines, choose a color from the Line Color pop-up menu.
  3. Changing the color of slice lines automatically changes the color of selected slice lines to a contrasting color.
To change slice color adjustments (ImageReady):
  1. Do one of the following:
    • In Windows and Mac OS 9.x, choose Edit > Preferences > Slices.
    • In Mac OS X, choose ImageReady > Preferences > Slices.
  2. Enter a value, or choose a value from the Color Adjustments pop-up slider for User slices, Auto slices, or both. (The User slices option controls color adjustments for both user slices and layer-based slices.)
  3. The value determines by how much the brightness and contrast of unselected slices are dimmed.

Converting layer-based slices to user slices


    Because a layer-based slice is tied to the pixel content of a layer, the only way to move, combine, divide, resize, and align it is to edit the layer. You can convert a layer-based slice to a user slice to unlink it from the layer.
To convert a layer-based slice to a user slice:
  1. Select a layer-based slice. In ImageReady, you can select multiple slices. (See Selecting slices.)
  2. Do one of the following:
    • (Photoshop) Click Promote to User Slice in the options bar.
    • (ImageReady) Choose Slices > Promote to User-slice(s).

Converting auto slices to user slices


    You can move, duplicate, combine, divide, resize, delete, arrange, align, and distribute user slices. You can also apply different optimization settings to user slices. In contrast, all auto slices in an image are linked and share the same optimization settings. This is because auto slices are regenerated every time you create or edit a user slice or layer-based slice.
    Converting an auto slice to a user slice prevents it from being changed when regeneration occurs. Dividing, combining, linking, and setting options for auto slices automatically converts them to user slices.
To convert an auto slice to a user slice:
  1. Select an auto slice. In ImageReady, you can select multiple slices. (See Selecting slices.)
  2. Do one of the following:
    • (Photoshop) With the slice select tool selected, click Promote to User Slice in the options bar.
    • (ImageReady) Choose Slices > Promote to User-slice(s).

Creating layer-based slices


    When you create a slice from a layer, the slice area encompasses all the pixel data in the layer. If you move the layer or edit the layer's content, the slice area automatically adjusts to encompass the new pixels.
    Example of how a layer-based slice is updated when the source layer is modified
    Layer-based slices are especially useful when working with rollovers. If you apply an effect to the layer--such as a drop shadow or glow--to create a rollover state, the slice automatically adjusts to encompass the new pixels. However, do not use a layer-based slice when you plan to move the layer over a large area of the image during an animation, because the slice dimension may exceed a useful size.
To create a slice from a layer:
  1. Select a layer in the Layers palette.
  2. Choose Layer > New Layer Based Slice.

Creating user slices


    You can create user slices with the slice tool or from guides, and in ImageReady, from a selection.
To create a slice with the slice tool:
  1. Select the slice tool hand or slice . Any existing slices automatically display in the document window.
  2. Choose a style setting in the options bar:
    • Normal to determine slice proportions by dragging.
    • Fixed Aspect Ratio to set a height-to-width ratio. Enter whole numbers or decimals for the aspect ratio. For example, to create a slice twice as wide as it is high, enter 2 for the width and 1 for the height.
    • Fixed Size to specify the slice's height and width. Enter pixel values in whole numbers.
  3. Drag over the area where you want to create a slice. Shift-drag to constrain the slice to a square. Alt-drag (Windows) or Option-drag (Mac OS) to draw from the center. Use snap to align a new slice to a guide or another slice in the image. (See Moving and resizing user slices.)
To create slices from guides:
  1. Add guides to an image. (See Using guides and the grid.)
  2. Do one of the following:
    • (Photoshop) Select the slice tool, and click Slices From Guides in the options bar.
    • (ImageReady) Choose Slices > Create Slices from Guides.
    When you create slices from guides, any existing slices are deleted.
To create a slice from a selection (ImageReady):
  1. Select a portion of the image.
  2. Choose Select > Create Slice from Selection.
  3. ImageReady creates a user slice based on the selection marquee. If the selection is feathered, the slice covers the full selection (including the feathered edges). If the selection is nonrectangular, the slice covers a rectangular area large enough to enclose the full selection.

Types of slices


    Slices you create using the slice tool are called user slices; slices you create from a layer are called layer-based slices. When you create a new user slice or layer-based slice, additional auto slices are generated to account for the remaining areas of the image. In other words, auto slices fill the space in the image that is not defined by user slices or layer-based slices. Auto slices are regenerated every time you add or edit user slices or layer-based slices.
    User slices, layer-based slices, and auto slices look different--user slices and layer-based slices are defined by a solid line, while auto slices are defined by a dotted line. In addition, each type of slice displays a distinct icon. You can choose to show or hide auto slices, which makes your work with user- and layer-based slices easier to view.
    subslice is a type of auto slice that is generated when you create overlapping slices. Subslices indicate how the image will be divided when you save the optimized file. Although subslices are numbered and display a slice symbol, you cannot select or edit them separately from the underlying slice. Subslices are regenerated every time you arrange the stacking order of slices.

About slices

You use slices to divide a source image into functional areas. When you save the image as a Web page, each slice is saved as an independent file that contains its own settings, color palette, links, rollover effects, and animation effects. You can use slices to achieve faster download speeds. Slices are also advantageous when working with images that contain different types of data. For example, if one area of an image needs to be optimized in GIF format to support an animation, but the rest of the image is better optimized in JPEG format, you can isolate the animation using a slice.



    Web page divided into slices: A. Image slice B. Layer-based slice C. No Image slice D. Slice that contains a rollover
    You set how the Photoshop or ImageReady application generates HTML code for aligning slices--either using tables or cascading style sheets--in the Output Settings dialog box. You can also set how slice files are named. (See Setting output options.)

Creating and viewing slices

A slice is a rectangular area of an image that you can use to create links, rollovers, and animations in the resulting Web page. Dividing an image into slices lets you selectively optimize it for Web viewing.

About designing Web pages with Photoshop and ImageReady


    When designing Web pages using Adobe Photoshop and Adobe ImageReady, keep in mind the tools and features that are available in each application.
    • Photoshop provides tools for creating and manipulating static images for use on the Web. You can divide an image into slices, add links and HTML text, optimize the slices, and save the image as a Web page.
    • ImageReady provides many of the same image-editing tools as Photoshop. In addition, it includes tools and palettes for advanced Web processing and creating dynamic Web images like animations and rollovers.
    When you save an image for use as a Web page, you can choose to generate an HTML file. This file contains information that tells a Web browser what to display when it loads the page. It can contain pointers to images (in the form of GIF, PNG, JPEG, and WBMP files), HTML text, linking information, and JavaScript code for creating rollover effects.
    You can integrate your Web production process by opening Photoshop files directly in Adobe GoLive. Slices, URLs, and other Web features in Photoshop files are accessible in GoLive for management and editing. You can also open Photoshop files in GoLive as page templates. Page templates display as a shaded preview and provide a visual guide for building a Web page in GoLive. For more information on using GoLive, see the Adobe GoLive User Guide.
    Note: You can preview most Web effects directly in Photoshop or ImageReady. However, the appearance of an image on the Web depends on the operating system, color display system, and browser used to display the image. Be sure to preview images in different browsers, on different operating systems, and with different color bit depths. (See Previewing an image in a browser.)

Customizing advanced color management settings

When you select Advanced Mode at the top of the Color Settings dialog box, you have the option of further customizing settings used for color management.

Specifying color management policies


    Each predefined color management configuration sets up a color management policy for the RGB, CMYK, and Grayscale color modes and displays warning messages to let you override the default policy behavior on a case-by-case basis. If desired, you can change the default policy behavior to reflect a color management workflow that you use more often. For more information on policies, see About color management policies.
To customize color management policies:
  1. In the Color Settings dialog box, under Color Management Policies, choose one of the following to set the default color management policy for each color mode:
    • Off if you do not want to color-manage new, imported, or opened color data.
    • Preserve Embedded Profiles if you anticipate working with a mix of color-managed and non-color-managed documents, or with documents that use different profiles within the same color mode.
    • Convert to Working Space if you want to force all documents to use the current working space.
    For detailed descriptions of the default behaviors associated with each policy option, see the table following this procedure.
  2. For Profile Mismatches, select either, both, or neither of the following:
    • Ask When Opening to display a message whenever you open a document tagged with a profile other than the current working space. You will be given the option to override the policy's default behavior.
    • Ask When Pasting to display a message whenever color profile mismatches occur as colors are imported into a document (via pasting, drag-and-drop, placing, and so on). You will be given the option to override the policy's default behavior.
    The availability of options for Profile Mismatches depends on which policies have been specified.
  3. For Missing Profiles, select Ask When Opening to display a message whenever you open an untagged document. You will be given the option to override the policy's default behavior.
  4. The availability of options for Missing Profiles depends on which policies have been specified.
    It is strongly recommended that you keep the Ask When Opening and Ask When Pasting options selected.
    Policy option
    Default color management behavior
    Off
    • New documents and existing untagged documents remain untagged.
    • Existing documents tagged with a profile other than the current working space become untagged.
    • Existing documents tagged with the current working space profile remain tagged.
    • For color data imported into a document using the same color mode, color numbers are preserved.
    • For all other import cases, colors are converted to the document's color space.
    Preserve Embedded Profiles
    • New documents are tagged with the current working space profile.
    • Existing documents tagged with a profile other than the current working space remain tagged with the original embedded profile.
    • Existing untagged documents use the current working space for editing but remain untagged.
    • For color data imported within the same color mode between either a non-color-managed source or destination, or from a CMYK document into a CMYK document, color numbers are preserved.
    • For all other import cases, colors are converted to the document's color space.
    Convert to Working Space
    • New documents are tagged with the current working space profile.
    • Existing documents tagged with a profile other than the current working space are converted to and tagged with the working space profile.
    • Existing untagged documents use the current working space for editing but remain untagged.
    • For color data imported within the same color mode between either a non-color-managed source or destination, color numbers are preserved.
    • For all other import cases, colors are converted to the document's color space.

Specifying working spaces


    In a color-managed workflow, each color mode must have a working space profile associated with it. (See About working spaces.) Photoshop ships with a standard set of color profiles that have been recommended and tested by Adobe Systems for most color management workflows. By default, only these profiles appear in the working space menus.
    To display additional color profiles that you have customized or installed on your system, select Advanced Mode in the Color Settings dialog box. To appear in a working space menu, a color profile must be bidirectional, that is, contain specifications for translating both into and out of color spaces. You can also create a custom RGB, CMYK, Grayscale, or Spot working space profile to describe the color space of a particular output or display device. (See Creating custom RGB profilesCreating custom CMYK profiles, and Creating custom grayscale and spot-color profiles.)
    For information about a specified RGB or CMYK working space profile, see the Description area of the Color Settings dialog box. (See Setting up color management.) The following information can help you specify an appropriate Gray or Spot working space:
    • For images that will be printed, you can specify a Gray or Spot working space profile that is based on the characteristics of a particular dot gain. Dot gain occurs when a printer's halftone dots change as the ink spreads and is absorbed by paper. Photoshop calculates dot gain as the amount by which the expected dot increases or decreases. For example, a 50% halftone screen may produce an actual density of 60% on the printed page, exhibiting a dot gain of 10%. The Dot Gain 10% option represents the color space that reflects the grayscale characteristics of this particular dot gain.
    Proof (no dot gain), and printed image (with dot gain)
    • For images that will be used online or in video, you can also specify a Gray working space profile that is based on the characteristics of particular gamma. A monitor's gamma setting determines the brightness of midtones displayed by the monitor. Gray Gamma 1.8 matches the default grayscale display of Mac OS computers and is also the default grayscale space for Photoshop 4.0 and earlier. Gray Gamma 2.2 matches the default grayscale display of Windows computers.

Customizing color management settings


    Although the predefined settings should provide sufficient color management for many publishing workflows, you may sometimes want to customize individual options in a configuration. For example, you might want to change the CMYK working space to a profile that matches the proofing system used by your printer or your service bureau.
    It's important to save your custom configurations so that you can reuse and share them with other users and Adobe applications that use the same color management workflows. The color management settings that you customize in the Color Settings dialog box are contained in an associated preferences file called Color Settings.
    Note: The default location of the Color Settings file varies by operating system; use your operating system's Find command to locate this file.
To customize color management settings:
  1. Do one of the following:
    • In Windows and Mac OS 9.x, choose Edit > Color Settings.
    • In Mac OS X, choose Photoshop > Color Settings.
  2. To use a preset color management configuration as the starting point for your customization, choose that configuration from the Settings menu.
  3. Specify the desired color settings (working spaces and policies). As you make adjustments, the Settings menu option changes to Custom by default.
  4. Save your custom configuration so that it can be reused. (See Saving and loading color management settings.)

Working with policy warnings and messages

The predefined color management workflows are set to display warning or option messages when a default color management policy is about to be used. Although you can disable the repeated display of some warnings and messages by selecting the Don't Show Again option, it is highly recommended that you continue to display all policy messages, to ensure the appropriate color management of documents on a case-by-case basis. (See Resetting all warning dialogs.) You should only turn off message displays if you are very confident that you understand the default policy decision and are willing to accept it for all documents that you open. You cannot undo the results of a default policy decision once a document has been saved.

About color management policies


    When you specify a predefined color management setting, Photoshop sets up a color management workflow that will be used as the standard for all documents and color data that you open or import. For a newly created document, the color workflow operates relatively seamlessly: the document uses the working space profile associated with its color mode for creating and editing colors.
    However, it is common to encounter the following exceptions to your color-managed workflow:
    • You might open a document or import color data (for example, by copying and pasting or dragging and dropping) from a document that is not tagged with a profile. This is often the case when you open a document created in an application that either does not support color management or has color management turned off.
    • You might open a document or import color data from a document that is tagged with a profile different from the current working space. This may be the case when you open a document that has been created using different color management settings, or a document that has been scanned and tagged with a scanner profile.
    In either case, Photoshop must decide how to handle the color data in the document. A color management policy looks for the color profile associated with an opened document or imported color data, and compares the profile (or lack of profile) with the current working space to make default color management decisions. If the profile is missing or does not match the working space, Photoshop displays a message that indicates the default action for the policy. In many cases you will also be provided with the opportunity to choose another action. For detailed information on the color management decisions associated with different policies, see Specifying color management policies.

About working spaces


    Among other options, predefined color management settings specify the color profiles to be associated with the RGB, CMYK, and Grayscale color modes. The settings also specify the color profile for spot colors in a document. Central to the color management workflow, these profiles are known as working spaces. The working spaces specified by predefined settings represent the color profiles that will produce the best color fidelity for several common output conditions. For example, the U.S. Prepress Defaults setting uses a CMYK working space that is designed to preserve color consistency under standard Specifications for Web Offset Publications (SWOP) press conditions.
    A working space acts as the color profile for untagged documents and newly created documents that use the associated color mode. For example, if Adobe RGB (1998) is the current RGB working space, each new RGB document that you create will use colors within the Adobe RGB (1998) color space. Working spaces also define the destination color space of documents converted to RGB, CMYK, or Grayscale color mode.

Using predefined color management settings


    Photoshop offers a collection of predefined color management settings designed to produce consistent color for a common publishing workflow, such as preparation for Web or offset press output. In most cases, the predefined settings will provide sufficient color management for your needs. These settings can also serve as starting points for customizing your own workflow-specific settings.
    To choose a predefined color management setting, choose one of the following options from the Settings menu in the Color Settings dialog box.
    Color Management Off
    Uses passive color management techniques to emulate the behavior of applications that do not support color management. Although working space profiles are considered when converting colors between color spaces, Color Management Off does not tag documents with profiles. Use this option for content that will be output on video or as on-screen presentations; do not use this option if you work mostly with documents that are tagged with color profiles.
    ColorSync Workflow (Mac OS only)
    Manages color using the ColorSync CMS with the profiles chosen in the ColorSync control panel. Use this option if you want to use color management with a mix of Adobe and non-Adobe applications. This color management configuration is not recognized by Windows systems, or by versions of ColorSync earlier than 3.0.
    Emulate Photoshop 4
    Emulates the color workflow used by the Mac OS version of Adobe Photoshop 4.0 and earlier.
    Europe Prepress Defaults
    Manages color for content that will be output under common press conditions in Europe.
    Japan Prepress Defaults
    Manages color for content that will be output under common press conditions in Japan.
    Photoshop 5 Default Spaces
    Preparation of content using the default working spaces from Photoshop 5.
    U.S. Prepress Defaults
    Manages color for content that will be output under common press conditions in the U.S.
    Web Graphics Defaults
    Manages color for content that will be published on the World Wide Web.
    When you choose a predefined configuration, the Color Settings dialog box updates to display the specific color management settings associated with the configuration.

Setting up color management


    Photoshop simplifies the task of setting up a color-managed workflow by gathering most color management controls in a single Color Settings dialog box. You can choose from a list of predefined color management settings, or you can adjust the controls manually to create your own custom settings. You can even save customized settings to share them with other users and other Adobe applications, such as Illustrator 9.0, that use the Color Settings dialog box.
    Photoshop also uses color management policies, which determine how to handle color data that does not immediately match your current color management workflow. Policies provide guidelines on what to do when you open a document or import color data into an active document.
To specify color management settings:
  1. Do one of the following:
    • In Windows and Mac OS 9.x, choose Edit > Color Settings.
    • In Mac OS X, choose Photoshop > Color Settings.
    TipTo display helpful descriptions of the options that appear in the dialog box, position the pointer over a section heading or menu item. These descriptions appear in the lower area of the dialog box.
  2. Do one of the following:

Creating a viewing environment for color management


    Your work environment influences how you see color on your monitor and on printed output. For best results, control the colors and light in your work environment by doing the following:
    • View your documents in an environment that provides a consistent light level and color temperature. For example, the color characteristics of sunlight change throughout the day and alter the way colors appear on your screen, so keep shades closed or work in a windowless room. To eliminate the blue-green cast from fluorescent lighting, consider installing D50 (5000 degree Kelvin) lighting. Ideally, view printed documents using a D50 lightbox or using the ANSI PH2.30 viewing standard for graphic arts.
    • View your document in a room with neutral-colored walls and ceiling. A room's color can affect the perception of both monitor color and printed color. The best color for a viewing room is polychromatic gray. Also, the color of your clothing reflecting off the glass of your monitor may affect the appearance of colors on-screen.
    • Match the light intensity in the room or variable lightbox to the light intensity of your monitor. View continuous-tone art, printed output, and images on-screen under the same intensity of light.
    • Remove colorful background and user-interface patterns on your monitor desktop. Busy or bright patterns surrounding a document interfere with accurate color perception. Set your desktop to display neutral grays only.
    • View document proofs in the real-world conditions under which your audience will see the final piece. For example, you might want to see how a housewares catalog looks under the incandescent lightbulbs used in homes, or view an office furniture catalog under the fluorescent lighting used in offices. However, always make final color judgments under the lighting conditions specified by the legal requirements for contract proofs in your country.

Do you need color management?


    Use the following guidelines to determine whether or not you need to use color management:
    • You might not need color management if your production process is tightly controlled for one medium only, for example, if you're using a closed system where all devices are calibrated to the same specifications. You or your prepress service provider may prefer to tailor CMYK images and specify color values for a known, specific set of printing conditions.
    • You also might not need color management if you are producing images for the Web or other screen-based output, since you cannot control the color management settings of monitors displaying your final output. It is helpful, however, to use the Web Graphics Defaults setting when preparing such images, because this setting reflects the average RGB space of many monitors. (See Using predefined color management settings.)
    • You can benefit from color management if you have more variables in your production process (for example, if you're using an open system with multiple platforms and multiple devices from different manufacturers). Color management is recommended if you anticipate reusing color graphics for print and online media, if you manage multiple workstations, or if you plan to print to different domestic and international presses. If you decide to use color management, consult with your production partners--such as graphic artists and prepress service providers--to ensure that all aspects of your color management workflow integrate seamlessly with theirs.

About color management


    Because color-matching problems result from various devices and software that use different color spaces, one solution is to have a system that interprets and translates color accurately between devices. A color management system (CMS) compares the color space in which a color was created to the color space in which the same color will be output, and makes the necessary adjustments to represent the color as consistently as possible among different devices.
    Note: Don't confuse color management with color adjustment or color correction. A CMS won't correct an image that was saved with tonal or color balance problems. It provides an environment where you can evaluate images reliably in the context of your final output.
    Photoshop follows a color management workflow based on conventions developed by the International Color Consortium (ICC). The following elements and concepts are integral to such a color-managed workflow.
    Color management engine
    Different companies have developed various ways to manage color. To provide you with a choice, a color management system lets you choose a color management engine that represents the approach you want to use. Sometimes called thecolor management module (CMM), the color management engine is the part of the CMS that does the work of reading and translating colors between different color spaces.
    Color numbers
    Each pixel in an image document has a set of color numbers that describe the pixel's location in a particular color mode--for example, red, green, and blue values for the RGB mode. However, the actual appearance of the pixel may vary when output or displayed on different devices, because each device has a particular way of translating the raw numbers into visual color. (See Why colors sometimes don't match.) When you apply color and tonal adjustments or convert a document to a different color space, you are changing the document's color numbers.
    Color profiles
    An ICC workflow uses color profiles to determine how color numbers in a document translate to actual color appearances. A profile systematically describes how color numbers map to a particular color space, usually that of a device such as a scanner, printer, or monitor. By associating, or tagging, a document with a color profile, you provide a definition of actual color appearances in the document; changing the associated profile changes the color appearances. (For information on displaying the current profile name in the status bar, see Displaying file and image information.) Documents without associated profiles are known as untagged and contain only raw color numbers. When working with untagged documents, Photoshop uses the current working space profile to display and edit colors. (See About working spaces.)

Why colors sometimes don't match


    No device in a publishing system is capable of reproducing the full range of colors viewable to the human eye. Each device operates within a specific color space, which can produce a certain range, or gamut, of colors.
    The RGB (red, green, blue) and CMYK (cyan, magenta, yellow, black) color modes represent two main categories of color spaces. The gamuts of the RGB and CMYK spaces are very different; while the RGB gamut is generally larger (that is, capable of representing more colors) than CMYK, some CMYK colors still fall outside the RGB gamut. (See Color gamuts (Photoshop) for an illustration.) In addition, different devices produce slightly different gamuts within the same color mode. For example, a variety of RGB spaces can exist among scanners and monitors, and a variety of CMYK spaces can exist among printing presses.
    Because of these varying color spaces, colors can shift in appearance as you transfer documents between different devices. Color variations can result from different image sources (scanners and software produce art using different color spaces), differences in the way software applications define color, differences in print media (newsprint paper reproduces a smaller gamut than magazine-quality paper), and other natural variations, such as manufacturing differences in monitors or monitor age.

Tuesday, December 27, 2011

umang stone sandstone mailer design

umangstone wishes you merry christmas


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All over the world, natural stone is making a comeback not just inside the house and on the roof,
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Friday, December 23, 2011

Happy Holidays

American use of the term "Happy Holidays" to replace "Merry Christmas



“A good holiday is one spent among people whose notions of time are vaguer than yours.”
“Be filled with the wonder, Be touched by the peace . . .Believe in the miracle. Merry Christmas”
“Like ornaments, thoughts of special people brighten the season and warm our hearts.”
“Peace on earth will come to stay when we live Christmas everyday”
“Once again, we come to the Holiday Season, a deeply religious time that each of us observes, in his own way, by going to the mall of his choice.”
“The most beautiful gift in all this world becomes dim in our sight when placed beside the gift of love God gave us on Christmas night.”
“One of the special joys of December is telling others we care and remember Love.”
“The holiest of all holidays are those Kept by ourselves in silence and apart; The secret anniversaries of the heart, When the full river of feeling overflows; The happy days unclouded to their close; The sudden joys that our of darkness start As flames from ashes; swift desires that dart Like swallows singing down each wind that blows!”

Gurbanguly Berdimuhamedow


Gurbanguly Berdimuhamedow has been the president of Turkmenistan since December 21, 2006. His self-given title 'Arkadag', means patron.
His detractors call his a torture-approving totalitarian dictator.
However, the president of Turkmenistan enjoys the support of two of the biggest importers of Turkmen natural gas -- Russia and Iran. He is also supported by countries like Kazakhstan and Saudi Arabia. 
In Turkmenistan, Berdimuhamedow does not have to deal with a lot of opposition as it is virtually banned.
As the country's minister of health, Berdimuhamedow supervised one of the worst healthcare infrastructures in Central Asia. He denied a large section of the population healthcare by closing all hospitals outside the capital city and replacing more than 15,000 trained doctors with military physicians. 
Continuing the tradition of Turkmenistan's late president Saparmurat Niyazov, Berdimuhamedow arrested, detained without trial, tortured, exiled, and killed his political opponents.
Berdimuhamedow has also not freed political prisoners wrongly imprisoned under Niyazov's regime. 

Ayatollah Ali Khamenei


Ayatollah Ali Khamenei is the Supreme Leader of Iran and the figurative head of the Muslim conservative establishment in Iran. 
The biggest challenge he faced as a leader was the mass protests following the June 2009 presidential elections.
Khamenei is widely regarded as the nominal head of the country's conservative establishment. He has been described as one of the three defining influences of the revolution.
In his inaugural address as president in 1981, Ayatollah Khamenei vowed to end "deviation, liberalism, and American-influenced leftists", in a statement that set the tone for his leadership. Reformists have criticised his use of "extra-legislative power".
Ayatollah Ali Khamenei has attacked Western powers who have criticised the rights record of the Islamic Republic for hypocrisy by economically oppressing people in third world countries.
Khamenei supported the persecution of Baha'ais and signed documents recommending several methods of oppression and ways of decreasing their influence.
Those believed to have insulted Khamenei have been arrested or punished on a less formal basis such as by being beaten by vigilantes. 

Bashar al-Assad


Bashar al-Assad is the president of Syria and regional secretary of the Ba'ath Party. Al-Assad was elected in 2000 and re-elected unopposed in 2007.
Bashar al-Assad has been criticised for a disregard for human rights, economic lapses and corruption in his domestic policy. He was also criticised for Syria's presence in Lebanon that ended in 2005, which partly led to the US putting sanctions on Syria.
The Syrian president has snubbed UN claims of bloody repression in his country. Bashar al-Assad rebelliously rejected allegations from around the world that his government was waging a crackdown on protesters.

Fidel and Raul Castro


The Cuban revolutionary Fidel Castro held the position of prime minister from 1959 to 1976, and then president from 1976 to 2008. 
Castro has been a controversial and highly divisive world figure. While his critics accuse him of being a dictator who has overseen multiple human rights abuses, back home he is lauded as a champion of anti-imperialism and humanitarianism by his supporters.
However, Fidel Castro has had a significant influence on the politics of a several world leaders, like Nelson Mandela, Hugo Chavez and Evo Morales, and he is widely idolised by many leftists, socialists and anti-imperialists across the world.
On February 24, 2008, his brother, Raul Castro was announced as Fidel's successor as president of Cuba.
In his first speech as Fidel's successor, Raul proposed that his brother continue to be consulted on matters of importance and socioeconomic development of the country. 

President of Zimbabwe, Robert Mugabe


Following the death of North Korean dictator Kim Jong Il, these are the dictators who continue to rule their nations. Their reign has often been questioned and criticised, with many of them being accused of human rights violation. 
Robert Mugabe
President of Zimbabwe, Robert Mugabe, is one of Africa's authoritarian leaders. Mugabe's policies have progressively evoked denunciation from both domestic and the international community.
While the president's critics damn his reign of terror and accuse him of being an extremely poor role model, his supporters pronounce him as a true Pan-Africanist.
Mugabe's long reign in Zimbabwe has, however, weakened along with his popularity in recent years, as his nation's economy continues to collapse.
Many experts believe that Mugabe is to blame for Zimbabwe's economic freefall.

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